Emerging K-ion and solid-state Mg-ion battery technologies
Shou-Hang Bo
University of Michigan ─ Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Abstract: Li-ion battery technology is at the center of renewable energy revolutions: they power millions of portable electronics, and have even been implemented in large-scale devices, such as electric vehicles. However, the limited supply of lithium and cobalt has dramatically increased the raw materials cost, with some economic experts claiming lithium to be the next precious metal. Here, we explore other battery chemistry which can be more cost-effective than lithium, i.e., K-ion and Mg-ion batteries. In this talk, we will discuss a number of potassium-ion battery cathodes. The electrochemical and structural characteristics of these cathode materials will be contrasted with those of the Na- and Li-ion counterparts, to illustrate the distinct battery chemistry occurring in K-ion cathodes. Furthermore, we discuss our recent efforts in the development of solid-state Mg-ion batteries. We overturn the common notation that Mg transport in solids is slow, and demonstrate that high Mg cation mobility in solids can be achieved through judicious tuning of crystal structure and chemistry.



Biography: Dr. Shou-Hang Bo received his B. S. degree in Chemistry from Fudan University; and Ph. D. degree in Chemistry from Stony Brook University, under the supervision of Prof. Clare Grey and Prof. Peter Khalifah. Since 2014, Dr. Bo had been a postdoctoral fellow in Prof. Gerbrand Ceder's group, at Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr. Bo joined University of Michigan ─ Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute in 2017 as a tenure-track assistant professor. His recent research interests include (1) material- and system-level studies of solid-state materials for energy storage devices; and (2) real-time spectroscopic and scattering studies of materials synthesis.